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Securing K-12 WiFi - A Scary Movie Blog
Posted by Louise Peter on Oct 31, 2017

It is a classic urban legend horror scene - a young woman is home alone (she is usually a babysitter). She receives creepy phone calls asking "Have you checked the kids?" The babysitter calls the police and the police set up watch outside the house to keep the babysitter safe. The police trace the phone calls and to their horror, they discover that the calls are not coming from another location, but they are coming from inside the house.

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Accelerate the Digital Enterprise with a Cognitively-Enabled WLAN
Posted by Nolan Greene, Sr. Research Analyst, IDC on Jun 12, 2017

What were once revolutionary words when talking about enterprise WLAN – monitoring, visibility, single-pane-of-glass management – now sound conventional to the ears of network managers. Today, for many, the features those words describe have evolved into what is now known as the “cloud console.”

As WiFi networks have moved from merely supporting the business to serving as its backbone, WLAN management must evolve as well. Yesterday's security, scalability, and remediation are inadequate for the digitally transformed enterprise in which WiFi is the conduit to customers, suppliers, and mission-critical business applications.

Toward a Vision of a Smart Classroom
Posted by Dr. Bhaskaran Raman on May 30, 2017

Have you imagined classrooms of the future, how they would look?  Today, despite the smart-device revolution and near-ubiquitous networks, technology is viewed as a distraction in a classroom, and even more so in an exam-room.  Having taught several classes of size 100+ at IIT Bombay, I believe that technology can be a positive enabler in a smart classroom.  Future classrooms should have enhanced interactivity, and enriched communication through the correct use of technology.  Students should be able to collaborate with one another, and teachers should be able to interact better with students, get feedback on their understanding, and also conduct exams easily.  The path to this vision lies in the effective use of the smart-phones already lying in the students’ pockets, to build a smart classroom.

We have conceptualized several applications in this direction.  The applications below are in different stages of development: some in early prototypes, some well tested and used.

Meraki MR53 MR42 benchmark performance test
Benchmark: The 4x4 Meraki MR53 vs. the 4x4 Mojo C-120
Posted by Robert Ferruolo (Dr. RF) on Sep 8, 2016

In a recent blog post we compared the performance of the Mojo C-120 to the Meraki MR42. In that blog we highlighted results of a test we ran last spring. When we test, we test the best of the competition with the latest software and published best practices at that point in time. When that test was run, the MR42 was the best Meraki had to offer. Once Meraki made the MR53 available, we tested it and here are the results.

HD Video Streams: How Many Can Your AP Support?
Posted by Robert Ferruolo (Dr. RF) on Aug 30, 2016

The classroom paradigm continues to shift as new technology is adopted. Long gone are the days of watching a movie in class by threading the film from one reel, through the projector, onto the other reel. Film was replaced by videotape, which was replaced by laser disks and then by DVDs. The new classroom instruction model includes HD video streamed wirelessly on demand from a local/regional distribution server (or from the web) to each student, who has their own computer or tablet.

The latest paradigm is much more personal and interactive, which greatly increases the number of clients (tablets, laptops, and smartphones), the client density, the different types of applications, and the requirements and bandwidth those applications. In order to be able to support this shift, many parts of the school’s IT infrastructure must be updated, especially the wireless LAN.

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Smart Client Load Balancing
Posted by Robert Ferruolo (Dr. RF) on Aug 16, 2016

Wireless Is Great, Except When It Isn’t

One of the challenges of WiFi is that clients are notoriously self-interested and use a very rudimentary decision-making process to determine which access point to connect to. This decision is simply based on AP signal strength or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The IEEE 802.11k standard is designed to help the clients make better, more informed roaming decisions, but to date very few clients have implemented it.