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WPA2 Key Reinstallation Vulnerabilities (KRACK) Explained
Posted by Hemant Chaskar on Oct 16, 2017
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Researchers from the University of Leuven (@vanhoefm and team) have discovered flaws in WPA2 implementation in clients and APs. These flaws create vulnerabilities for replay and decryption attacks on packets transferred over WiFi links. They have named them KRACKs (Key Reinstallation AttaCKs). Both 802.1x (EAP) and PSK (password) based networks are affected. These vulnerabilities have been cataloged under 10 CVEs. In the series of videos below, I explain these CVEs in detail with Vivek Ramachandran, Founder and CEO of Pentester Academy.

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4 Ways to Supercharge Your Outdoor Wi-Fi
Posted by Sriram Venkiteswaran on Aug 4, 2015

Great news: you can now have outdoor Wi-Fi that is easier to manage, more secure, and increases revenue.

…And the Meshin’ is Easy
Posted by Dwight Agriel on Jul 29, 2014

As someone who has walked more than a few miles in a network administrator’s shoes, I’m all too familiar with the challenges of configuring and troubleshooting mesh environments. In my last position, as an administrator responsible for 300+ mesh nodes, I know the stress and frustration of dealing with dropped connections along with the other problems associated with mesh environments.

The Growing Prevalence of Wi-Fi Extension with Mesh
Posted by Andrew vonNagy on Apr 21, 2014

Industry professionals have tended to view mesh networking from a “realist” point-of-view as a niche solution to be avoided if possible, and have never considered the technology the most popular of Wi-Fi capabilities. This pragmatism is rooted in the typical negative performance implications of mesh networks. Just a few years ago mesh capability was limited to a few highly targeted products that served niche markets for large-scale outdoor deployments or service provider environments. These solutions typically relied on multi-radio mesh units, which provide frequency separation between uplink and downlink traffic paths as well as between upstream and downstream hops, in an attempt reduce the negative performance impact for high bandwidth backhaul links.

However, there exists a growing market for mesh networking that utilizes single-radio mesh units to provide an extension of network access across limited mesh hops for hard to wire locations.