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A Mojo Customer Story: Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio (UAX)
Posted by Cherie Martin on May 22, 2017
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Today’s learning environments are evolving and growing at a rapid pace, with more students & faculty accessing and sharing online content than ever before.  For many schools, it is a balancing act to meet the demand for ever-increasing bandwidth on a secure network utilizing fixed budgets and existing IT staffing levels.  

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Aerohive, Aruba, Cisco, Meraki, and Ruckus Let Users Suffer with Interference
Posted by Robert Ferruolo (Dr. RF) on May 11, 2017

How often do you say “Wow, this WiFi is great!”? WiFi is like a utility, you take it for granted until the lights don’t turn on or water doesn’t come out of the tap. Just like the electrical grid or the water infrastructure, WiFi takes planning to implement correctly and maintenance to keep running smoothly.

The great news is that WiFi keeps getting smarter and Mojo is leading the way with Cognitive WiFi™. An example of our dedication to excellent user experience is how the C-130 uses its third radio and Dynamic Channel Selection (DCS) to quickly, reliably, and automatically detect disruptive interference.

We recently performed a benchmark test to see how well access points avoided channels with high WiFi and non-WiFi interference on boot up and during operation. We evaluated how well the AP avoided interference and how user experience was impacted.

The Mojo C-130 was the only access point to avoid interference 100% of the time, on both boot up and when introduced on the operating channel. All other solutions failed to avoid a channel with a constant interference source that made the channel unusable, or failed to change channels when the channel utilization got so high that it severely impacted the user experience.

User experience was evaluated using the following quality score rating system:


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What Drives Great WiFi Access Point Performance? Hardware Components and Software Architecture.
Posted by Robert Ferruolo (Dr. RF) on Sep 20, 2016

Why don’t most enterprise WiFi access point vendors tell you what’s inside their AP? They don’t publish which WiFi chipset the AP uses, or the CPU specification. At best they state the amount of RAM. When you evaluate APs for your deployment, you should consider hardware components. Hardware components and the software running on it will impact the AP’s performance and user experience. The test results below demonstrate this.

Ruckus R710 Mojo C-120 distributed client benchmark test
Mojo C-120 Accepts the Ruckus R710 BeamFlex Challenge
Posted by Robert Ferruolo (Dr. RF) on Sep 15, 2016

While doing research on the Ruckus website for the R710, I noticed the statement of “Up to 2 times extended range and coverage with Ruckus BeamFlex technology.” Challenge accepted! To evaluate this claim we used a distributed client test, which determines the AP’s downstream performance when its clients are spread near and far, from excellent to marginal signal strength and points in between. This test simulates the performance of the AP in a typical enterprise, carpeted environment.