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Fanning the Flames of Rebellion with Honor
Posted by Rick Wilmer on Sep 14, 2017
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Witnessing ethical train wreck after train wreck in Silicon Valley, it’s easy to conclude that the quest for success at all costs is a recent phenomenon and one limited to startups.

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Year of the Horse: Wi-Fi and Security Thought Leadership
Posted by AirTightTeam on Feb 26, 2015

In many Asian countries, the New Year is based on the lunar calendar and is dictated by the first new moon and ends on the full moon. In the case of the Chinese calendar, each New Year is marked by the characteristics of one of the 12 zodiacal animals: the rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, sheep, monkey, rooster, dog and pig.

2015: The Year of Experience and Scale
Posted by Hemant Chaskar on Jan 16, 2015

Scale versus Scalability

They are different notions. Scale is mostly about numbers, but scalability incorporates business enablement in addition to scale.

How Long Will Wi-Fi Protect You from Carrier Monetization Programs?
Posted by AirTightTeam on Nov 13, 2014

In the last couple of weeks, several reports on carriers’ plans and practices to track and analyze their mobile web traffic caught the attention of consumers and privacy watchers.

What’s Under the Hood in WiFi Analytics
Posted by kevin.mccauley on Nov 5, 2014

Our security researchers recently took a look at Apple’s iOS8 MAC randomization feature. It was touted by Apple for its ability to protect consumer privacy from persistent WiFi tracking, but turned out to be of limited usability as currently implemented. With all the interest in privacy features, we thought we’d give you a look at what’s ‘under the hood’ in retail WiFi analytics.

Google Pushing HTTPS Further
Posted by Hemant Chaskar on Sep 11, 2014

Implications for Public Facing Wi-Fi Security, Advertising and Analytics

You may have already noticed - Google search has been strictly using HTTPS for some time now. Typically, people do not enter passwords in keyword search and so people probably were not terribly worried about search sites not using HTTPS (Bing still allows HTTP). Nonetheless, Google seems to have taken position in favor of HTTPS. YouTube also allows HTTPS (though HTTP option is also available today). When YouTube page is accessed over HTTPS, videos also stream over HTTPS (a way to check this is funny name option called "Stats for nerds" which shows on right click on YouTube video). One could also say Google is making a point here that HTTPS isn’t necessarily the scalability bottleneck today.

What Facebook friends info is shared during social login, and does it spam them?
Posted by Hemant Chaskar on Aug 20, 2014

Will my friends get spam if I use Facebook social login? What information about my friends will be shared?

What is Driving Free Guest Wi-Fi?
Posted by Sean Blanton on May 9, 2014

In the comments to my earlier blog post (Social Wi-Fi and Privacy: Keeping Balance in the Force), Dale Rapp correctly notes that brick and mortar stores can use social Wi-Fi and analytics as a way to compete with online commerce, where every click of the mouse is tracked and scrutinized.

It’s been my experience that many B&M stores begin their thinking on implementing Free Wi-Fi as simply for Free Wi-Fi’s sake – they recognize that their competitors are doing it and that more and more shoppers are using its presence as a deciding factor in where they spend their time; this creates the feeling of crap-we-need-to-do-this-too (and most people don’t like to feel that way).

New opportunities for engagement

Plain-vanilla Wi-Fi or social Wi-Fi? Savvy businesses pick social.

It’s the savvy groups that recognize that their network can provide more than just Free Guest Wi-Fi; it’s a new opportunity to communicate directly with their visitors, one that takes advantage of the latest technologies and behaviors of modern consumers – and that’s the whole idea behind Social Wi-Fi.

Social Wi-Fi and Privacy: Keeping Balance in the Force
Posted by Sean Blanton on May 8, 2014

I read with interest Lee Badman’s article in Network Computing: Social WiFi Sign-In: Benefits With A Dark Side. Despite the gloomy title, the article is a fair and balanced look at both benefits and privacy implications of social Wi-Fi.

Would you join a loyalty program to get a coupon?

Perfect timing, I said to myself. Facebook just announced that they will be adding new functionality to their OAuth capabilities which would allow users to access any service using Facebook OAuth anonymously. This is obviously in reaction to the ongoing privacy conversation across the entire Internet spectrum. And it just so happens that we at AirTight released a blog post about it on the same day as Lee Badman's article ran: Facebook ‘Anonymous Login’: What Is the Impact on Social Wi-Fi? We've maintained since the beginnings that Social Wi-Fi should allow an anonymous path for any user who does not want to engage on social media.

Facebook 'Anonymous Login': What Is the Impact on Social Wi-Fi?
Posted by Sean Blanton on May 7, 2014

Reporting from Facebook's developer conference, CNET writes:

"The biggest news for Facebook's 1.28 billion members is "Anonymous Login," a twist on the standard Facebook Login option that gives people a way to try an app without sharing any of their personal information from the social network. The move addresses concerns about user privacy as Facebook seeks ways to encourage people to explore new apps."

Note "Not so social?" option below the social login buttons.

"Facebook says it's testing the new log-in option with select developers,including Flipboard. That means you likely won't see the black button in your favorite apps for several months."

"The news aligns with one of the event's broader themes around putting people first and giving them more control over their data. Zuckerberg expounded upon this notion of improving trust and getting people more comfortable with using Facebook in conjunction with third-party apps."

How does this impact social Wi-Fi, and specifically social log-ins?

As it turns out, we at AirTight recognized early on that despite tremendous growth and acceptance of social media generally, it's essential that users are provided a means to utilize Wi-Fi services anonymously.