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Under the Hood of Vendor Unlocked Whitebox APs
Posted by Sudhan Kayarkar on Apr 17, 2017

The data center industry has embraced hardware/software disaggregation promoted by Open Compute Project (OCP) in servers and switches. It brings benefits of cost, flexibility and innovation. OCP has now started a working group called Campus, Branch and Wireless (CBW) to extend disaggregation concept to enterprise networking. For additional details on OCP/CBW whitebox WLAN AP, see this #wlpc 2017 video presentation by @CHemantC. Mojo Networks has been an active contributor to the CBW group. At the recently concluded Open Compute Summit in Santa Clara, we demonstrated open install of Mojo WLAN software on the latest Qualcomm 802.11ac Wave 2 AP platforms manufactured by 3 different hardware vendors (ODMs). 

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Benchmark: C-120 vs. Aerohive AP250 in the Classroom
Posted by Robert Ferruolo (Dr. RF) on Sep 14, 2016

WiFi is a Utility, and Needs Capacity Planning

When is the last time you said: “Wow, this WiFi is great!”? You don’t really notice it when it works. You are more likely to say: “This WiFi is crap” when it doesn’t meet your expectations. WiFi is no longer a convenience, it’s an essential utility like electricity. You would like it work every time and without hesitation, like turning on a light.

Like the power grid, one of the biggest challenges in designing a wireless network is capacity planning. The goal of capacity planning is to determine how many access points are needed to provide a good user experience. Deploying too many APs is a waste of money and can make performance worse, but deploying too few will cause user experience problems (the equivalent of brownouts) when an AP becomes oversubscribed.

HD Video Streams: How Many Can Your AP Support?
Posted by Robert Ferruolo (Dr. RF) on Aug 30, 2016

The classroom paradigm continues to shift as new technology is adopted. Long gone are the days of watching a movie in class by threading the film from one reel, through the projector, onto the other reel. Film was replaced by videotape, which was replaced by laser disks and then by DVDs. The new classroom instruction model includes HD video streamed wirelessly on demand from a local/regional distribution server (or from the web) to each student, who has their own computer or tablet.

The latest paradigm is much more personal and interactive, which greatly increases the number of clients (tablets, laptops, and smartphones), the client density, the different types of applications, and the requirements and bandwidth those applications. In order to be able to support this shift, many parts of the school’s IT infrastructure must be updated, especially the wireless LAN.